No shoes, please!

In a recent post, I said that I’ll share some of my childhood stories. See here. Today’s post is about a cultural practice that we brought from Guyana to the U.S. We take off our shoes before entering our home. We never asked our parents why we had to take off our shoes, we just did it. I suppose the main reason is for cleanliness. Think of all the dirt and yucky stuff our shoes touch daily – it is best to leave all those germs outside.

Some floor activities in Guyana:

  1. Some families sat on the floor to eat their daily meals (not so common nowadays)
  2. The women often sat on the floor to “pick rice” – removing all the black rice or pieces of foreign objects that came with the rice.
  3. Some families sat on the floor to cut their vegetables.
  4. Everyone sat on the floor for all Hindu and Muslim ceremonies.
  5. Guests also sat on the floor to eat the meal that was served after the religious ceremony.
  6. Many babies and young children slept on the floor during the day, so moms can keep an eye on them while they did their chores.
  7. The floor converted to a bed when guests stayed over.

We still practice some of the activities listed above here in the U.S.

I also want to share with you that worshipers take off their shoes at all mandirs and mosques. No exception.

Here at home, I wear a pair of fluffy slippers 🙂  When I visit someone’s home, I take off my shoes, unless the host asks me to keep them on.

Here is a picture of the shoe rack in our garage (very messy). I keep all my “nice” shoes in boxes in my bedroom.

shoe rack

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No Sausage, please!

Okay, today’s post is a bit of a rant.

I don’t like to fuss over the cost of my food, but I think what happened last week was “highway” robbery, or more fittingly, “drive-thru” robbery. I was at a restaurant chain, which will remain unnamed (the Golden Arches) and I was overcharged. Yes, overcharged because their “machine” doesn’t allow them to adjust any prices. I ordered a sausage “golden arches” muffin with egg, but without the sausage. I asked the person who took my order not to charge me for the sausage. She said that it can’t be done because the machine doesn’t allow her to do so. She will have to charge me the full price. Since I was in the drive-thru, and I was aware that folks were behind me, I allowed her to charge me the full price.

What she should have done: ring up the price for an egg, a muffin, and the cheese separately.

I know it is possible because this courtesy was extended to me in the past

Lesson for me: The next time I want to order anything other than coffee, find a parking space, walk into Yellow Arches, and place a face-to face order.

Have a happy Sunday, everyone!

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Credit: Google images

The Black Sage Toothbrush

While speaking with a childhood friend yesterday and reminiscing about school days, I realized that I couldn’t remember all of the details that surrounded some of the activities we did in school. This got me thinking of experiences that I’d like to share with my children and grandchildren (I hope to be gifted with some grand-kids later in life). Since I haven’t limited my blog to any particular theme, this is a good vehicle for documenting stories and experiences.

Here in the USA, the basic tool for brushing your teeth is the toothbrush and so my children find it “crazy” that we often used the stem of a plant to clean our teeth in rural Guyana. Yes, we had toothbrushes, but when they were not available, we broke off a stem from the Black Sage shrub, pounded or chewed on one of the ends until it got some bristles, applied some toothpaste, and brushed our teeth. If there was no toothpaste, we simply put some salt on that homemade toothbrush and carried on.

When was a toothbrush not available?  If I spent the night at my aunt’s home or if my toothbrush broke, I won’t have had one. Generally, folks did not have extra toothbrushes in their cupboards – simply a matter of not being able to afford such luxuries. Some families, because of the pressures of poverty, did not have toothbrushes at all.

What is this Black Sage? The scientific name for this shrub is Cordia Curassavica. It has small white flowers and tiny red berries that grow in a cluster at the end of the branches.

Below is a photo of the Black Sage. Credit goes to: https://www.inaturalist.org

Black Sage

An Act of Honesty and Integrity

If you were to ask me to share my recent encounter that showed the goodness of the human soul, I would share this heart-warming story with you…

On Monday, April 4, I left my school right after dismissal to pick up a bale of 400 grocery bags at the neighborhood Publix grocery store for an Earth Day project. I took my phone, driver’s license, and debit card with me – no handbag. While I was waiting for the manager to bring the bags from the stockroom, I decided to buy a mango key lime pie and get $75 cash back with my purchase. When I received my cash, I wrapped the receipt around it and placed it in my pocket. As I was putting the money in my pocket, I said to the cashier, “my pocket is too shallow for cash”, but proceeded to do so anyway.

On my way back to school, I called the office for a dolly to transport the bags to my classroom. I arrived in the front of the school, only to find that there was no dolly, so I went to the office to see what was happening. As I was speaking with my colleague, I reached into my pocket and…guess what? There was no money! I retraced my steps to the car, looked around, but no cash. How was I feeling? Disappointed. I knew that my pocket was too shallow for cash, yet I did not pay attention that fact.

I decided to call Publix because in my heart I felt that if someone found the money, he or she will turn it in. Here is how part of the conversation went:

Me: “Hi, this is Elaine. I just picked up some grocery bags at your store.”

Cashier: “Yes, I remember you.”

Me: “Do you recall that I told you that my pocket is too shallow for cash I got when I bought the key lime pie?”

Cashier: “Yes, I remember. I have your money. A customer turned it in.”

Me: “I am so happy. Thank you! Thank you! Thank you! I will be there soon.”

When I hung up the phone, I gave thanks for the person who returned my money and drove back to Publix with smiles on my face and gratitude in my heart.

The person who found my cash could have kept it for himself, but he chose to return it to the store. He demonstrated his honesty and integrity in a very tangible way. What a model of good citizenship!  His actions warmed my heart and reiterated that I am truly blessed. Although I couldn’t give him a tangible reward, I know that he will be rewarded for his act of care and love. I am grateful for this gentleman who showed us the goodness of his soul.

cash back

Getting Creative with my Handwriting

What? Handwriting analysts can find over 5,000 personality traits just by looking at my handwriting? Whoa! This information has my eyes popping and my mind twirling. Today’s writing prompt, asks bloggers to simply respond to the word handwriting . It would appear that the stars of blogging have been aligned for me because I’ve been trying to improve my handwriting and today’s prompt is just right.

My handwriting is poor. I’ll even say that it is terrible. It can look pretty mangled, especially if I am in a hurry. I mix printing with cursive all the time. Sometimes, I’m embarrassed because of the quality of my handwriting. At times it is so bad that I struggle to read my own notes. Okay, enough of the beating up on myself; I’m taking action to get neater and more legible handwriting.

As I write this post, I fondly recall the note my professor wrote on one of my in-class essays, she scribbled, “bad handwriting”. Hmmm…I decided to have a bit of fun with it, so I sauntered up to the front of the class and whispered to her, “it’s hard to read your comment, what did you write”? Needless to say, we both had a good laugh.

The picture I’m including today is the product of one of my “practicing my handwriting” sessions. I discovered that with a few curved lines and a bit of playfulness, I could have some fun with my ABCs. The teacup is my creative expression of the lowercase cursive ‘S’. Are you able to see it? I’ve taken the risk of putting a sample of my handwriting! I hope you focus on my words “when I give my best, my best becomes better”, more than my handwriting! Of course, if you are inclined to send me an analysis of my handwriting, that will be great.

What would you like to share about your handwriting? What are your thoughts on those 5,000 personality traits?

Thank you for visiting and commenting!

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Elaine’s Cursive Lowercase S

My Gratitude Jar

flowers -joyHabits, whether good or bad, start off as thin as a single strand of hair – easy to snap. However, if we continue with the behavior, that same strand-like habit will grow to be strong and sturdy like chain links – difficult to break. Having an attitude of gratitude is a habit. This is a habit that I am constantly working toward; it is not easy. It takes work. It requires reflecting, sifting through life experiences, and being aware that there is value in all my interactions.  It is not easy to be in gratitude when negativity steps in, when there is illness, death, or when bad news comes our way. However, I know if I search within, there is always something for which I can be grateful.

Over the years, I’ve attempted to keep a gratitude journal, but after a short period, the journaling of my thoughts became a dormant idea. Some time ago, I heard about the gratitude jar and I promised myself that I would start one. I don’t need a journal or a jar to express my gratefulness, but this tangible means of reflecting helps me to recognize my blessings and joys.

The birth of my Gratitude Jar was on January 12, 2016.  See photos at the end of this post.

My first note of gratitude:

This evening I spent some time with Rosh as she worked on her “bottle this feeling” jars. Her “About” page on her website talks about how being grateful contributes to your happiness – what a beautiful reminder for me as I bottle 101 thoughts in my head. I am grateful to my daughter for reminding me to live with an attitude of gratitude.

Here is another note from January 16th

I’m in gratitude for…

  • Kind, caring, listening ears
  • The gift of time
  • The gift of friendship
  • Knowing when to speak softly and quietly
  • Lessons in time management
  • Being honored with trust
  • Prayers and positive energy

I have decided to grow the habit of being in gratitude today and every day. I find that being grateful brings me joy. Although I do not write gratitude notes with pen and paper daily, I write them with my reflections and actions.

 Today, among other things, I am grateful for your friendship, my health, and the peace, joy, and positive energy that surround me.

 Thank you for visiting my blog!

 With gratitude,

 Elaine

 

A life Lesson from Sand Mandalas

Dear Readers,

I’ve been away from my blog and your blogs for several months now. A few life events kept me away and even zapped my motivation and discipline to post here and visit with you. Today, I feel ready to recommit my energy to blogging. It will take some time for me to catch up with your posts, but my intention is to visit your blogs as soon as possible.

This evening, I’m reflecting on an experience I had in 2010 which I posted here.

In 2010, I had the wonderful opportunity of witnessing the monks at the Buddhist temple in Miami create extraordinary, intricate, and immensely beautiful sand mandalas. As I observed their patience, skill, and mindfulness of their art, I felt a sense of peace within me. It was hard for me to understand how their dedication, love, and skill to the beautiful art they created will disintegrate after a few days; it will all be swept away and they knew it.

Now, years later, looking back at those moments, I can truly see how anything we create or build, no matter the work, skill, beauty, love, time, and talent we put into it, can all be undone and swept away. We just have to accept, embrace, and be in gratitude for the value and all that the creation brought us.  Life is filled with dual experiences and we learn and grow from each one of those experiences.

I’m glad that you’re visiting my blog!

With gratitude,

Elaine