The Black Sage Toothbrush

While speaking with a childhood friend yesterday and reminiscing about school days, I realized that I couldn’t remember all of the details that surrounded some of the activities we did in school. This got me thinking of experiences that I’d like to share with my children and grandchildren (I hope to be gifted with some grand-kids later in life). Since I haven’t limited my blog to any particular theme, this is a good vehicle for documenting stories and experiences.

Here in the USA, the basic tool for brushing your teeth is the toothbrush and so my children find it “crazy” that we often used the stem of a plant to clean our teeth in rural Guyana. Yes, we had toothbrushes, but when they were not available, we broke off a stem from the Black Sage shrub, pounded or chewed on one of the ends until it got some bristles, applied some toothpaste, and brushed our teeth. If there was no toothpaste, we simply put some salt on that homemade toothbrush and carried on.

When was a toothbrush not available?  If I spent the night at my aunt’s home or if my toothbrush broke, I won’t have had one. Generally, folks did not have extra toothbrushes in their cupboards – simply a matter of not being able to afford such luxuries. Some families, because of the pressures of poverty, did not have toothbrushes at all.

What is this Black Sage? The scientific name for this shrub is Cordia Curassavica. It has small white flowers and tiny red berries that grow in a cluster at the end of the branches.

Below is a photo of the Black Sage. Credit goes to: https://www.inaturalist.org

Black Sage

An Act of Honesty and Integrity

If you were to ask me to share my recent encounter that showed the goodness of the human soul, I would share this heart-warming story with you…

On Monday, April 4, I left my school right after dismissal to pick up a bale of 400 grocery bags at the neighborhood Publix grocery store for an Earth Day project. I took my phone, driver’s license, and debit card with me – no handbag. While I was waiting for the manager to bring the bags from the stockroom, I decided to buy a mango key lime pie and get $75 cash back with my purchase. When I received my cash, I wrapped the receipt around it and placed it in my pocket. As I was putting the money in my pocket, I said to the cashier, “my pocket is too shallow for cash”, but proceeded to do so anyway.

On my way back to school, I called the office for a dolly to transport the bags to my classroom. I arrived in the front of the school, only to find that there was no dolly, so I went to the office to see what was happening. As I was speaking with my colleague, I reached into my pocket and…guess what? There was no money! I retraced my steps to the car, looked around, but no cash. How was I feeling? Disappointed. I knew that my pocket was too shallow for cash, yet I did not pay attention that fact.

I decided to call Publix because in my heart I felt that if someone found the money, he or she will turn it in. Here is how part of the conversation went:

Me: “Hi, this is Elaine. I just picked up some grocery bags at your store.”

Cashier: “Yes, I remember you.”

Me: “Do you recall that I told you that my pocket is too shallow for cash I got when I bought the key lime pie?”

Cashier: “Yes, I remember. I have your money. A customer turned it in.”

Me: “I am so happy. Thank you! Thank you! Thank you! I will be there soon.”

When I hung up the phone, I gave thanks for the person who returned my money and drove back to Publix with smiles on my face and gratitude in my heart.

The person who found my cash could have kept it for himself, but he chose to return it to the store. He demonstrated his honesty and integrity in a very tangible way. What a model of good citizenship!  His actions warmed my heart and reiterated that I am truly blessed. Although I couldn’t give him a tangible reward, I know that he will be rewarded for his act of care and love. I am grateful for this gentleman who showed us the goodness of his soul.

cash back

Getting Creative with my Handwriting

What? Handwriting analysts can find over 5,000 personality traits just by looking at my handwriting? Whoa! This information has my eyes popping and my mind twirling. Today’s writing prompt, asks bloggers to simply respond to the word handwriting . It would appear that the stars of blogging have been aligned for me because I’ve been trying to improve my handwriting and today’s prompt is just right.

My handwriting is poor. I’ll even say that it is terrible. It can look pretty mangled, especially if I am in a hurry. I mix printing with cursive all the time. Sometimes, I’m embarrassed because of the quality of my handwriting. At times it is so bad that I struggle to read my own notes. Okay, enough of the beating up on myself; I’m taking action to get neater and more legible handwriting.

As I write this post, I fondly recall the note my professor wrote on one of my in-class essays, she scribbled, “bad handwriting”. Hmmm…I decided to have a bit of fun with it, so I sauntered up to the front of the class and whispered to her, “it’s hard to read your comment, what did you write”? Needless to say, we both had a good laugh.

The picture I’m including today is the product of one of my “practicing my handwriting” sessions. I discovered that with a few curved lines and a bit of playfulness, I could have some fun with my ABCs. The teacup is my creative expression of the lowercase cursive ‘S’. Are you able to see it? I’ve taken the risk of putting a sample of my handwriting! I hope you focus on my words “when I give my best, my best becomes better”, more than my handwriting! Of course, if you are inclined to send me an analysis of my handwriting, that will be great.

What would you like to share about your handwriting? What are your thoughts on those 5,000 personality traits?

Thank you for visiting and commenting!

S2

Elaine’s Cursive Lowercase S